2 bladed fan with 1 motor

Written by: techguru

Picture of 2 bladed fan with 1 motorIMGP6287.JPGIMGP6287.JPG

1 Motor = 2 Fans
More Efficient Mechanical Energy Usage

There are several examples all around us of mechanical energy being converted into electrical energy. Windmills, for example, and hydroelectric plants. 

The first takes the power of the wind to drive fans, and this turns motors that become electrical energy to be stored for use.

The second uses the force of gravity when water either falls down a substantial height or goes from a point of higher pressure to a point of lower pressure, passing through a valve – again with a fan that drives a motor.

A weight suspended at a certain height and attached to a fan that turns while the weight succumbs to gravity is nice, except that eventually the weight would reach the ground, and then the energy would stop, or has to be brought up to the first height again. In that sense it is not practically harnessing energy, because it expends energy to bring the weight up before gravity is taken advantage of.

Similarly, we can also take advantage of electrical energy being converted to mechanical energy, as is the case with the electric fan. The electricity turns the motor, which turns the blade, which provides moving air.

But why only attach the motor to one fan? 

With the knowledge of gears or belts, several fans can be connected to the motor to take advantage of its spinning – as much as the space will allow – to drive several fans. If the motors and the fans are sufficiently frictionless, the motor does not have to expend more energy to drive two fans than it does to drive just one fan.

Thus the need to have several fans – all with their own motors – in one room can be eliminated, because having just one motor drawing electricity from the system then sending them out to a lot of fans pointing in different directions can already provide sufficient ventilation for a room.

Step 1:

1 Motor = 2 FansMore Efficient Mechanical Energy Usage
There are several examples all around us of mechanical energy being converted into electrical energy. Windmills, for example, and hydroelectric plants.
The first takes the power of the wind to drive fans, and this turns motors that become electrical energy to be stored for use.
The second uses the force of gravity when water either falls down a substantial height or goes from a point of higher pressure to a point of lower pressure, passing through a valve – again with a fan that drives a motor.
A weight suspended at a certain height and attached to a fan that turns while the weight succumbs to gravity is nice, except that eventually the weight would reach the ground, and then the energy would stop, or has to be brought up to the first height again. In that sense it is not practically harnessing energy, because it expends energy to bring the weight up before gravity is taken advantage of.
Similarly, we can also take advantage of electrical energy being converted to mechanical energy, as is the case with the electric fan. The electricity turns the motor, which turns the blade, which provides moving air.
But why only attach the motor to one fan?
With the knowledge of gears or belts, several fans can be connected to the motor to take advantage of its spinning – as much as the space will allow – to drive several fans. If the motors and the fans are sufficiently frictionless, the motor does not have to expend more energy to drive two fans than it does to drive just one fan.
Thus the need to have several fans – all with their own motors – in one room can be eliminated, because having just one motor drawing electricity from the system then sending them out to a lot of fans pointing in different directions can already provide sufficient ventilation for a room.

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